It’s Been a Slice…

You know when you learn a new word and then you hear it everywhere for the next week?

Or when you think you’re pregnant, and you start seeing babies everywhere?

Well, this has been my reality for the last month. 

No no, I’m not pregnant!

The truth is that I’ve been being given numerous signs and even support on a decision to move on from this blog and newsletter.

For the last few months I’ve been working on a project called Yolopalooza. It’s an event I’m putting on here in Toronto that is largely based on my favourite topic and question that’s come out of my work here –

How can we add more fun to our lives?

This blog all started with a desire to learn more about myself and grow as a writer. Well, I feel like I’ve done a lot of that and gotten even more out of it than I could have imagined.

Because of this blog I’ve connected with so many of you around the world and gotten to know some of you more closely as my personal clients. It’s been an honour to be a part of your journey.

But I’m being pulled towards this other work, pretty loudly I must say. It’s come to me in the form of random websites, podcasts and even articles in newspapers that I never read.

I even came across some of the best advice I’ve ever gotten in my whole darn life.

So, I hope you’ll come along with me for this next part.

I’ll even share that ‘best advice ever’ at some point – probably in my first NEW post.

But if finding more fun for your life is not what you need right now and you choose to call it a day with me, that’s cool too. Let me leave you with some parting advice that is my best attempt to sum up what I’ve learned with you these last four years.
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(Whenever I get down about being too old or not old enough, I come back to this idea)

Being in your thirties is a privilege not everyone gets to experience. Sometimes it’s hard AF but, if you keep searching, you’ll eventually find answers and begin to see the greatest parts!

 

With all my love and humblest gratitude,

Ashe

 

Here’s where to find me next:

yolopalooza.com

@yolopalooza

yoloverse.wordpress.com

 

I’m Starting to Hate ‘Millennials’ [WARNING: CONTAINS ADULT LANGUAGE]

You may or may not have noticed the radio silence on the blog. I don’t know if anyone is reading anymore, and I don’t really blame you if you aren’t.

I had to take a serious break from being part of this cultural obsession with generations and where we all fit and how we’re all going to deal with our different communication styles. And trust me, if you’re sick of reading the word, ‘millennial,’ then you can bet I’m sick of writing it.

There was no such word as ‘millennial,’ when I started writing the blog, if you can believe it. It’s hard to imagine now since it’s ubiquitous now in news stories and social media posts. But lately I’ve started to feel like I was drowning in the buzzword of the moment, unable to compete with the constant outpour of articles on millennials.

When I first started writing the blog it was because I was in a scary-dark place – depressed and looking for answers for what I wanted to do with my life and what it actually meant to be an adult woman with absolutely no plans for her future.

When I thought that I could explore these questions through writing, I got excited for the first time in months. I loved the idea that no one was really talking about the fact that the game of being an adult has totally changed from only ten years ago and I wanted to explore it hard – I also really needed to because I desperately needed those answers for myself.

Why is everything more difficult, more expensive, more challenging, more draining, and more shitty than I ever imagined? Is everyone else getting this joke but me? Am I the only one who feels like her body is a grave misrepresentation of the scared little girl inside?

Then, I guess, because I write about thirty-somethings, my friends and family started sending me videos, articles and social media posts about the latest articles with the buzzword ‘millennial’ in the headline, thinking that this is what I’m looking for.

And yes, sometimes the topic overlaps – some millennials are now in their thirties, some are GenX and some are caught somewhere between. But really (and I must be clear here): I don’t give a fuck about what generation anyone comes from – every generation of this century, I believe (and maybe beyond that) will have a specific struggle as they transition from twenties to thirties because of the way Western society is currently set up.

… And besides journalists and marketing specialists, I don’t think anyone else really does either.

And I’m so sick of the word, the concept and the fact that every writer and their mother thinks they know how to classify the millennial mind and who millennials really are, what they want and how they behave. It’s just so stupid.

The irony is that millennials are all about breaking down labels and accepting differences, but we’re forcing them to be categorized and stereotyped every step of the way, just to impress Google.

It’s also ineffective. I can’t believe we’re spending so much time reading the articles on this instead of getting our hands dirty and just talking to the young people we work with.

Sure millennials grew up in a different time and technology makes them seem more separate and new, but isn’t every generation new, wide-eyed and full of hopeful ideologies? Didn’t the flower children of the seventies spark the same interest and become a movement that helped us all evolve into a more loving and accepting society?

Millennials are just the next step; they’re taking it all a little further once again. That’s all. It’s not really that amazing, surprising, or really as fucking difficult as everyone says it is in all these articles.

“Millennials are so hard to please and understand”.

Garbage! I call serious bullshit on this.

They’re just people. They’re just younger fucking people. Talk to them like people and you’ll find out they’re actually pretty cool, happy to help and normal fucking humans – not an alien race of weirdos that the press makes them out to be, just for dramatic effect.

And really, the only reason ‘millennial’ is such as buzzword is because at any other time in history, writers and reporters would use words like ‘today in business’ and ‘nowadays,’ ‘current social behaviours.’ But these words are too mundane to be picked up by Google and improve your SEO ranking or get you featured in a hashtag search. The result is that we see ‘millennial’ get overused everywhere when really we’re just talking about how the world is progressing.

Personally, I really don’t give a shit what generation you come from – that’s not my question; that’s not where my curiosity leads me.

So, just to be clear: My questions are about adulthood – adulthood in the twenty-first century when apparently it’s okay to dress like a child, love cartoons, shoot each other with paint but also know how to pay down debt and navigate the new roles of male and female in the workplace, online, politics and even our own sexual relationships.

Send me your millennial articles if you must, but also look through them for yourself. Do you have a millennial in your life that you can ask if the article is on point or can you perhaps smell the bullshit wafting out of the desperate writer’s keyboard? Write about millennials, she says, that’s always a hit!

So this last month I just needed a break. I needed to step back and regroup with what my intent is here. I have no interest in the millennial hype. I have real questions that I think truly matter to people over thirty, and they have nothing to do with our top ten worst cellphone habits or our work ethic as it compares to the boomers.

Right now I’m working on the questions on my own. I want to know where our culture is really heading.

I want to know if higher education is about to die because of the fear of debt.

I want to talk about the pain of not being able to conceive, or the pain of not being able to have it all in a world full of endless options and over-stimulation.

I want to know what keeps you up at night and what really gets you going and motivated to go to the same crappy job every day (besides an Oprah quote clad in gold-glitter handwriting on a rose gold background).

There’s a lot of pain we’re all holding in and a lot we might also be chalking up to #firstworldproblems, but that’s bullshit too. It’s all relative.

What if we solve some of our pain here so we can be our best selves and help others; help the planet; help animals; help help help and love?

That’s what keeps me up at night before I close my iPad.That’s what I search for and what I think is worth writing about and talking about. #everyone.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on any or all of this. Are you feeling like the millennial craze is everywhere and just too much? Are you sick of how many times I used the word ‘millennial’ in this article seemingly to up my SEO (ironic, yes, but kind of unavoidable this time, really)? How’s your adult life going so far?

Mine’s ok. I’m working it out.

With hope and more fire,

Ashe

With my extra time away from posting, I revamped the site and the blog. What do you think? Leave a feedback comment on the Facebook page before JUNE 15th and receive a 30 minute FREE coaching call!

Check out the new website here: ashewoodward.com

Tom Hanks’s Special Message to Thirtysomethings

One of the greatest lines from Tom Hanks, in my opinion, is in A League of Their Own when he’s coaching a woman on his team who complains that baseball is “hard”.

“It’s the hard that makes it great,” he booms.

I shiver. I shudder. I feel the urge to grab my glove and hit the field.

It’s a great line made even greater by the fact that it’s not really about baseball at all, but everything in life, including life itself.

“Nothing worth anything comes easy,” they say. I’m revved up again.

But I’m not quite ready to grab my glove, so to speak.

See, in the case of baseball, I know what the challenge it and what glory looks like when I get there – cheering fans, a golden glove, a pennant, a world series ring, a bubblegum card.

But when it’s my life, I’m blindly aiming at a target most days.

New job? Different hairstyle? Swipe right? Go back to school? Ignore colleague’s wandering eyes? Vacation or staycation? Retirement savings?

Why can’t it be as simple as hit and throw well. Run as fast as you can. ? .

I don’t have the answer. Life is just hard sometimes. Hard to predict, hard to get through certain days (even certain hours). It’s hard to imagine it getting better and easy to imagine worse.

But “the hard is what makes it great”. Hmmm.

And let me be completely honest – I’ve been watching that movie for years; it’s one of my top favourites of all time. But it’s only recently that I’ve embraced this Hankonian perspective.

Since I turned 30, life has pretty much been a not-so-great box of chocolates. Surprise after disappointment after struggle after a brief bout of delight and repeat.

And now, in my mid-thirties, I finally get the joke – without the hard, there is no delight. And, most importantly I see that without the unknown, there is no hope.

I don’t know if I’m ever making the right choices and I worry about the outcome.

I don’t know if I’m giving the best advice to my friends.

I don’t know if I just paid too much for house insurance.

I don’t know if this time, this yoga will save me.

I don’t know any of it.

But I just hope. Close my eyes and click.

And just when you may be thinking that this is a depressing way to live – directionless and all that. Consider this:

We’re all floundering along, doing our best and still f-—king up and making a mess. Sometimes hating ourselves, sometimes forgiving.

Dropping kids off at the wrong school (hi, Jill) and standing in awkward silence at your first stand-up gig. Keeping it secret that your marriage is a sham, secretly liking one kid more than the other, and spending over twenty-one hours streaming Netflix instead of going to your cousin’s wedding.

Point is, screwing up and acting immature and being embarrassed about our foibles is all part of the game.

My friend Jillian drops off the kids she babysits every day. I don’t know how many days are in a school year, but it’s a lot. But she’s never told me a specific story about it until the day she left the wrong kid at the wrong playground.

And we laughed. OH, we laughed!

We laughed until we cried.

There may be no crying in baseball but there are plenty of tears in life – happy and sad. And I love them both. I’m a cryer so I have no choice but to embrace it if I stand a chance of loving myself fully.

So cheers to hope. Cheers to the struggle. It’s real, so they say.

Life is hard, so play hard. Screw up, and then laugh. Together.

Laughter and hope make it great.

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I’m opening my doors again for personal coaching now for a limited time. If you’d like to see what coaching is like and if you’d like to work together, send me an email at ashewoodz@gmail.com so we can set up a time to talk.

For more on me and what working together is like, visit ashewoodward.com.

😉

What 35 REALLY Feels Like (and how to deal)…

Today is my birthday!

I’m 35, I keep repeating in my head, waiting for a shift, a boom, a bolt of lightening as maturity and endless wisdom kick in. But so far? Nothin.

I don’t quite know how I feel yet. I don’t know if I’m totally freaking out or if I’m really as cool as I say I am about being officially in my mid-thirties.

One thing that always haunts me is the phrase, Age is just a number. I’ve never really understood the whole reassuring aspect of it. Age is a number, yes, but how long can I go saying I’m in my thirties but feeling like I’m still eighteen? Eventually, shouldn’t I feel like a grown-up?

It reminds me of when the news tells me it’s going to be 10 degrees but feels like 15. The next day it could be 10 degrees again but feel like 8. There could be a whole week of 10-degree weather where not one day actually feels like 10 degrees, so we lose our baseline and start to forget what 10 degrees is actually like!

Okay, I’ll fess up, these digressions and rantings are all just a facade – a cover up because I don’t know how old I feel and I don’t know how I feel about it. Man, birthdays have a ways of making us oddly contemplative, don’t they? I guess I’ll just leave it alone until I’m sure.

Any time I start to go on these tangents I know I’m just procrastinating or distracting myself from a mess of feelings that I need to untangle. To do this (you can steal this technique too for when you catch yourself avoiding the BIG questions) is to start with what small things you know for sure.

For me, what I do know today is that I am truly grateful for all of my family and friends that came out and celebrated with me last night (and the impromptu animal balloon-making contest that topped it all off). The best part of the night for me though was when I looked around the room and totally blissed out at seeing all of my favourite people in one place.

I also know that I’m humbled, grateful and extremely privileged to have lived thirty-five years. In that time I’ve been surrounded by love, enjoyed endless opportunity and I’ve been blessed with good health and well-being; I’m a pretty lucky duck and I know it.

Some may say that this technique helps you go back to basics but I’m seeing now that I don’t see any of these things as basic at all. Love, health, family and friends are perhaps good fundamentals of a great life, but they’re not basic. Their fully enlightening, supercharged presence in our lives is a supreme and ethereal gift.

Talk about birthday reflection…Woah.

And on that note..time for cake!… (and more avoidance until the real impact kicks in…)

 

If you’ve got  some reflecting you  need to do, we should chat in a FREE consultation session. I’ve done my  fair share of reflection and gotten off-track, so I’ve developed proven ways to help  anyone get down with their bad (and good) self.  My one to  one coaching is about how in our thirties especially we are learning  to identify our true feelings and emotions and only  taking  action that speaks to our personal value system (AKA, the stuff people are talking  about when they say, “Just be yourself!… as if it’s so easy!)

Get in touch at support@ashewoodward.com

Or find more info at ashewoodward.com/coaching

We’re Not Lazy: A Response to Simon Sinek’s Millennial Thing

Most people define Millennials as those born in the early eighties. Being born in early 1982, I’m kind of on the cusp of GenX too and I often find myself offended by comments made about both generations. And as a mixed-generational woman it’s also hard to resolve that while  I love Nirvana and Soundgarden, I’m also addicted to posting food pics on Instagram. It’s a continuing inner battle.

But GenX has been accused of being a rather ‘meh’ generation — to use a Millennial phrase. It’s been said that we haven’t really contributed much to culture and, as a smaller segment of society, we lack the impact that the Boomers or the Millennials have.

Speaking of which, Millennials are all about the ‘impact’. Simon Sinek, in his recent viral video on Millennials in the workplace (watch HERE) almost sneers at this word in his interview, implying that we really don’t know the true meaning of it. He makes it sound like we like to throw the phrase ‘make and impact’ around but don’t know how to actually implement strategies to achieve it.

Sinek also says that Millennials are being “accused” by older generations as, “lazy, entitled and impatient.” He claims that we got here by being told that we are “special” and when we grow up we can have anything we want, which he says is a mistake in Boomer and GenX parenting strategies.

Sure this contributed, and Sinek is careful to say that this was no one’s fault. So why then does it still feel like we’re playing the blame game here?

Oh ya, because this isn’t the whole story. And maybe it’s also that we feel like saying, “Hey Simon, you’re not a Millennial so it does feel like you’re accusing us too.”

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But perhaps because of time constraints in the interview Sinek isn’t able to paint the fuller picture of all the motivations for why Millennials are ‘the way they are,’ but I personally think he missed the biggest one to point out:

It’s not that we’re lazy, we just DON’T WANT TO WORK TO DEATH!

We’ve seen the Boomers kill themselves, working 9–5 jobs, 5 days a week for years, just to reach retirement, where life can finally ‘begin’.

We’ve seen near-idyllic marriages fall part after twenty plus years.

And, we’ve seen GenX sit there, admittedly, like deer in the headlights, not knowing what this all means or what to do next and as a result and be paralyzed by fear, resulting in this ‘non-contributing generation.’

This then has resulted in more divorce, more stress, more ‘hard-work’ because maybe, just maybe, we thought we could stick to the old model if we just did it more and harder.

Enter the Millennials with our ‘lofty’ ideals of work less, live more . What a ‘lazy concept.’

Or is it a revolt and a rebellion that society needs?

Entitled? Yep. I agree with Sinek here. We were told we could have it, so now we want it. We’re an ambitious generation who know what we want. Is that so terrible?

We’re saying that working to live for the weekends isn’t cutting it. We’re saying that ya, let’s have beanbag chairs to start, but that’s only the beginning. And (duh!) it’s only a symbol for how we see the workplace as the first place paradigms need to shift.

We’re saying we accept that we live in a culture where we are what we do for a living. But we’re also asking if there’s a better way.

And maybe we are sitting around pondering the idea too much. Or maybe we are on our phones, playing Angry Birds, avoiding the weight of it all. But you can’t deny that we’re shaking it up – at least more than GenX. No offense.

It seems that everyone has seen this video and lately when I share what I do for a living and what I blog about, most people mention this clip and are more than eager to agree with Sinek, saying he, “hit it out of the park,” and everything is “right on the money”. They laugh in agreement at how they don’t understand how we can be so addicted to devices and be so unruly to manage. They look to me as if I’ll high-five them because someone is finally putting these entitled brats in their place.

But I don’t think that’s not what Sinek wants us to see. And I’m not high-fifing just yet.

Sinek is a fabulous leader and that’s what he’s most known for – teaching leadership skills. Undoubtedly, his voice will be an important one as Millennials get older and become the leaders of the generations that follow. But he’s not a Millennial. He’s right there with all the other leaders trying to figure out what will inspire Millennials to make all the impact we want to make which will inevitably help everyone, including the generations to come.

He’s struggling to figure out how to lead us as we’re trying to break the mold. And where he’s landed seems to be in a place of pointing out the very worst in us so we look in the mirror, while urging us to hold on to what’s important – relationships and patience.

Interestingly, a few websites describe him as an optimist, but one of the biggest things I have a problem with in his interview is his description of the, ‘best case scenario.’ He says that if we continue to exhibit impatience and a lack of relationship skills, we will become a very uninspired, neutral generation that is ‘fine’ with how things are in their life – from relationships to career, Millennials will stop asking for more and will give up on their ambitions. In other words, we will fully embrace a life of, ‘meh.’

I have to call BS on this. That’s a pretty pessimistic outlook, Mr. Sinek. It’s here that I wonder if he really isn’t being ironic afterall…

By challenging the 9-5 work day and the 5-day work week with our more entrepreneurial and non-profit spirits, we’ve already begun to shift an over 100 year old system. See, we got a little taste of the impact that’s possible and we want more.

And I don’t think our idealism and ambition will be worn down by nay-saying Boomers and GenXers. I think we’re just itching to be in those leadership positions so we might show you how it’s done.

Maybe we’re hard to manage because we don’t trust you. And maybe we don’t trust you because we’re addicted to our devices, or maybe it’s that you haven’t given us a reason to. I mean, why should I want to be like you and work tooth and nail for a thankless corporation that pollutes the environment? Or how can I really use the the words of wisdom from a mentor who started his career before computers were smaller than an entire room?

Sure we’re going to have to make adjustments to the ways technology has influenced our lives, especially our relationships, but we’re working on it. You may see our obsession with devices as a terrible addiction, but it’s also made us pretty industrious.

And our entitlement? Well, I personally think it’s dwarfed by our ingenuity and desire to add our flavour to the zeitgeist soup. Just watch.

Or maybe Sinek is right and we won’t figure it all out and we’ll continue not to know what we want. Then the next generation will be saddled with the responsibility of pleasing a generation who can’t articulate what needs to be done. Oh, how will they be able to impress these leaders who want you to work less but better?

I guess they’ll just have to up their game, raise the standards and forward humanity once again. 

So for that, and for being impatient, entitled and lazy: #sorrynotsorry.

What did YOU feel when you were watching the interview? Do you think Sinek is ‘on point’ or ‘out to lunch’? 

I’d love to hear more about what OUR GENERATION has to say as a defence or response to this.

Leave a comment here or on the Facebook page where you can chat with the whole

Being Thirties community!

And, as always, keep in touch by going to ashewoodward.com 

Don’t Finish 2016 Without This

Today was supposed to just be “Tree Decorating Day” but it also turned into “Eggnog and Rum Day” in our house (see the pics on Facebook).

While feeling a little “happy” my husband and I sat and did a little informal review of 2016 – what we did, liked, hated (note: not being prepared for our mortgage to be renewed made the  “never do again” list – live and learn!).

I personally see this and exercises like this as super-critical, especially in our thirties. Our thirties are generally viewed as the years where we build away like busy, busy beavers: reputations, relationships, careers, our savings, families.

And compared to our twenties, our thirties are when we really get down and dirty with creation – we know it’s crunch time and we’re ready to grab life by the you-know-whats and paint ourselves the beautiful picture we all dreamed life would be when we were younger.

The thing is, we can fall into the trap of building, building away and not taking a step back from the canvas to see what it’s all becoming.

Yes, our thirties are when we’re building and establishing a lot of things BUT we’re also accomplishing a great deal too.

That’s why, when you hear everyone (including me!) advising you to review and list all the great stuff you did this year, don’t roll your eyes or say you’ll do it later and never do…

Really take a moment to count up your wins.

This really is most important for us thirtysomeones because if we just continue to toil away, push and push, build and build, we’ll burn out.

And that’s when mistakes are made.

That’s when we make poor decisions and later have to start all over again. And I don’t know about you, but I ain’t got time for that s#*t!!

We’ve got our big dreams here AND we want to see them come to fruition IN our thirties, not waaaaaay in the future, right?

Trust me when I tell you that success in your 30s is more than a dream – it can be a reality. But recognition for all your hard work, your baby steps in the right direction, your effort to get out of your comfort zone are all fundamental to the foundation of whatever amazing creation you’re working on.

And because I think it’s so grave, I’ve created a downloadable plan that will help organize your thoughts for both December and January! Get it HERE

I’d love to hear what happened for you this year and what you’re continuing to build.

Post it here or on the Facebook Page, where we can get the conversation started. This is the place for you if one of your goals is “meet more like-minded people.”

So dream big and review hard!!

And if you’re already beginning to make your goals for 2017, this guide is a MUST!

Download The Thirtysomething’s Guide to Successful Goal-Making 

goalmaking

And get in touch for a FREE coaching consultation to create a plan for all of your DIG DREAMS to come true in 2017. Get in touch at support@ashewoodward.com

What Kind of ‘December Person’ Are You?

I don’t need to tell you that this is a stressful time of year – crowded malls, Christmas music on loop, and getting in the last morsels of the year before we start all over again.

But beyond the shopping, headaches and travel, there might also be another source of anxiety on your mind…depending on what kind of person you are.

Maybe you’ve noticed it too, but it seems that depending on how ambitious you are or how serious you are about your goals, at this time of year, everyone falls mainly into two categories at the beginning of December:

  • Person 1 will focus on the holidays and family but also use this busy time as an excuse for why she has let her dreams and goals shift to the back burner. She just doesn’t have the time.
  • Person 2 isn’t slowing down. This kind of person aims to get it all in and not only achieve most of what’s on his resolution list, but also may push himself so far that he “doesn’t have the time” to find the perfect gifts. By January 1st he has many of his goals achieved and is ready to amp up his performance in 2017.

You may be thinking that you really wish you could be like Person 2, but you may want to think twice.

Sure, Person 1 seems to be making excuses, giving up and giving in. This could inevitably stall momentum at a great time of year for doing business. If you have a product or service, this is the best time to advertise your stuff as gift ideas or as ways to start off the new year just right. And even if you don’t work for yourself or in sales, you could always do just a tad more than the guy beside you so you grab the boss’s attention at the holiday party for promotion considerations ASAP for next year.

But, this is also supposed to be the time of year for reflection and connection. To push past or rush the holiday season like Person 2, would be to miss the whole point of our cleverly designed yearly cycle. We (well, our ancestors), designed our year to have a beginning and an end, with certain celebrations strategically placed because we crave ups and downs, endings and beginnings.

To rush past the ending would be a waste of the whole year. It’d be like watching the new Gilmore Girls series and just stopping at “summer”! [Note: No spoilers, but seriously, get past “Summer” because Rory has a big moment in “Fall”].

Person 2, however, does have the right idea in some ways – using December to achieve what you promised yourself last January – that’s part of having integrity and loving yourself.

But there needs to be balance. I don’t usually use this vague word but here I think we get it. Our two portraits are extremes but very present this time of year. It’s our job to see which qualities we have in ourselves and make a point of taking a page out of both books.

It’s also integral to success in the future that we take the time now to reflect on what’s been achieved up to this point. Regroup. Celebrate. Acknowledge your support system. And use the reflection (not the stress and the pushing yourself to the limits all month long) to inspire your January 2017.

Let me say that again: use the reflection on 2016 as the fuel to your fire in 2017. Rushing to complete your goals now is possible, but not essential to your success next year. You’ll be more successful if you can acknowledge what you learned in the past year and be grateful for your wins, as well as the people around you.

Sure, there may be some other sub-categories of these two types: I for one can be more like a crazy Person 2 on steroids because not only do I try to overachieve in my career and goals, but I also try to find the perfect gifts thanks to my A-type personality. This usually causes a bit of overwhelm at this time of year.

So a couple years ago, when I noticed this cray-cray behaviour in myself, I committed to having my shopping done before December 1st. I’ve fallen only a little short this year with two people left on my list, but that’s what the Internet is for. The rest of the time I’ll be focusing on my goals, reflecting and celebrating with “special” eggnogg.

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Like all things, it’s about finding a balance and knowing your priorities. It’s sometimes very hard to do it all and get it all in BUT do try these 5 main tips for a more enjoyable and successful holiday season:

  1. Don’t blame the holidays or your relatives for your unwillingness to find time. It’s like I always say, ‘Beyoncé has the same amount of hours in the day as everyone else.’
  2. Buy gifts online to save time. I have some recommendations if you’re curious. Click Here.
  3. Buy thoughtful gifts to thank all the people around you that enrich your life and keep you going.
  4. Reflect on 2016 and use the positives to light you up for the upcoming year.
  5. Draw up your priorities for 2017 based on what you think you were lacking this year. Don’t beat yourself up, just promise yourself to get ‘er done next year.

And don’t worry! I’ve still left plenty of time for new clients this month so you don’t have to go it alone. December is a great time to get started – we can reflect together and plan out your success for the new year together with a solid and strong 2017 success strategy.

Never hesitate to get in touch! Email me your questions at support@ashewoodward.com and find out more at ashewoodward.com.

And for added inspiration when creating your 2017 goals, be sure to have this guide handy!

Download your FREE copy of The Thirtysomething’s Guide to Successful Goal-making

goalmaking